Chuggles22

Landscapes

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4 minutes ago, Chuggles22 said:

You turned your share into a gif... that's pretty awesome!

You get extra credit for the extra touch. two thumbs up [thumbup][thumbup]

Two days out on the snow with the kid and the dog and I lost 1000 crowns , but I feel happy. :) 

For the first time I used giphy.com and it seems a good one. There is one more program that I discovered this days. It is called  "Telegram messenger" , it's the same as Viber, but it takes less resources on the device, sends pic.&video way faster, and works even with poor internet connection. Pity that it is not so popular. 

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Last weekend:

Friends dog in center, we hiked over 11 miles and I'm pretty sure the dog did twice that because he kept running ahead and coming back lol

3tg1toU.jpg

Waterfall near the base of the trail

3f2P28D.jpg

Not the top but there was no view there so this was the best we got

WcyJ0k8.jpg

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I didn't want to start a separate thread for this and since there are quite a few landscapes included in this collection, I figured 'why not here', so:

http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/photographer-of-the-year-2018/gallery/winners-all/1/

Some very exceptional photography by fairly ordinary folks. :D

Edited by Scythian Fury

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Images from todays hike, My buddy and I took a detour off the trail to go check out a B25 bomber that crashed in 1948. Below is the description of events that I was able to find about the crash.

This B-25 Mitchell Bomber in the drainage of Friday and Balsam Cap mountains crashed on the evening of March 31st, 1948. Its USAAF tail number is 44-29215. It rolled off the assembly line on September 9th, 1944 and saw action over France during WWII before coming back as a trainer. It was flying just such a training mission in 1948 when navigation errors led the crew to believe they were flying over Newburgh preparing to let down at Stewart Airfield, when in fact they had been over Kingston and were headed straight towards Friday mountain (3694'), impacting at 2,700 feet elevation and bursting into flames. The pilot was Captain Richard B. Willis. Two other crew members were aboard and all perished.

May those brave men rest in peace..

See the source image

 

The American Star decal is still barely visible on the side

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View from above

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Part of the ***pit

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One of two engines at the scene

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The pic below is more akin to what the rest of the hike looked like

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